Male Power?

Why is changing a light bulb always a guy’s job? Because women have more important things to do – like making men feel useful and important by giving them things to do, like changing light bulbs.

How many divorced men does it take to change a light bulb? None. They never get the house anyway.

— Edmonton Journal,
2007 08 28, p. B2, Venting
(more at edmontonjournal.com Online Extras – Venting)

It will take quite some time yet, however, before a majority of society gets Warren Farrell’s message expressed in the following.

One of the fascinating parts about men is our tendency to subject ourselves to war, physical abuse, and psychological abuse and call it “power.” The ability to be totally out of control while continuing to view ourselves as the ones with the power can have certain advantages to a woman. As expressed in this poem:

One-Night Stand

He bought me drinks all evening
in response to just a wink
Then accepted my invitation to
repair my kitchen sink
Then I brought him into beddy-bye
to get a little sex
Then couldn’t help but smile
when he called it conquest!

WHY MEN ARE THE WAY THEY ARE, By Warren Farrell, p. 289

That story, translated into a joke that is far more ironic than it is funny, goes like this:

An Irishman, an Englishman and a Scotsman were sitting in a bar in Sydney. The view was fantastic, the beer excellent, and the food exceptional. “But” said the Scotsman. “I still prefer the pubs back home. Why in Glasgow there’s a little bar called McTavish’s. Now the landlord there goes out of his way for the locals so much that when you buy 4 drinks he will buy the 5th drink for you.”

“Well.” said the Englishman “At my local, the Red Lion, the barman there will buy you your third drink after you buy the first two.”

“Ahhh, that’s nothin'” said the Irishman “Back home in Dublin there’s Ryan’s Bar. Now the moment you set foot in the place they’ll buy you a drink, then another, all the drinks you like. Then when you’ve had enough drink they’ll take you upstairs and see that you get laid. All on the house.”

The Englishman and Scotsman immediately poured scorn on the Irishman’s claims. He swore every word was true.

“Well,” said the Englishman “did this actually happen to you?”

“Not to me personally, no,” said the Irishman, “but it did happen to my sister.”

found at angryharry.com

(More)

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Excerpt from The apprehension of children – boys – in antiquity, by Walter Schneider, Fathers for Life

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