Violence: A crime most often committed by women

[UK] The Times

July 31, 2008

Violence takes over from shoplifting as the crime women most often commit

Richard Ford, Home Correspondent

Violence has for the first time overtaken shoplifting as the most common crime by women, according to annual statistics released yesterday.

During 2006-07 the number of women detained for violent offences reached 87,000 — an increase of 11 per cent on the previous year. The number arrested for theft and handling stolen goods was 80,000, down 6,400 on the previous year….(Full Story)

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Addendum (2017 12 26 1:47, by Walter H. Schneider): The indicated article does not support the assertion made in the title for this blog posting, but it doesn’t rule it out.  Moreover, it obfuscates the objective truth. It misleads, by narrowing its focus on women’s violence, through directing it only to “the number of women detained for violent offences.”  That has a fine effect.  It excludes all instances of violent offences for which women are not being detained, and it excludes all instances of violence for which women will never be detained but that nevertheless not only hurt victims of women’s violence but are very often fatal.

Take a few categories of violence that articles such as the one indicated rarely, if ever, address:

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* Infanticide

Infanticide is a euphemism for the murder of a child.

Violence, infanticide, that is: Massacre of the Innocents

Massacre of the Innocents — one of the first instances of large number of infants on record (and all of them were boys)

Curiously, the definition of infanticide is pliable and has changed much during the last hundred years or so, in lock-step with our ever-growing tolerance for crimes committed by women, especially violent ones (whether that pertains to violent women or violent crimes committed by women makes little difference).

In other words, murder is an absolute term.  It describes the deliberate taking of a murdered victim’s life by other than legal means or for other than legal reasons.

Infanticide is a relative term. it relates to the deliberate taking of a murdered victim’s life by means or in circumstances that we change by our perceptions of what we wish to be tolerable as to time frame, circumstances and the sex of the perpetrator.  Our perceptions of what constitutes such a crime change over time

• In 1922, in England, the crime of child murder was reduced to manslaughter, for murderers of victims that had not yet reached more than the age of one to two days. The reasons given in arguments for leniency toward women who kill their children: Hormonal imbalance due to breast-feeding; Failure to recover from the effects of giving birth to “such children”. (More)

That was just a first step.

• “In 1938, Britain revised its infanticide statute, extending the age of victims from “newly born” to “under the age of 12 months.” To justify this extension, the revised statute cited “the effect of lactation” on a woman’s mind.  It was decided, in effect, that breastfeeding could drive women mad….” (According to Patricia Pearson, in her book When She Was Bad (Random House of Canada, also available from Viking), that infanticide is “The Problem That Still Has No Name.” (More)

• Definition of infant per Encylopædia Britannica: »….children from ages 0 to 36 months.
Different milestones characterize each stage of infant (0 to 12 months) and toddler (12 to 36 months) development. Although most healthy infants and toddlers reach each milestone within a specific window of time, there is much variation as to how wide that window may be. For example, culture, environment, socioeconomic status, and genetic factors can influence when an infant or toddler will begin to crawl, walk, or talk….«

Definition of infant per Merriam Webster’s dictionary: »1: a child in the first period of life; 2: a person who is not of full age : minor«

By that it can be seen that by now anyone who never grew up to become mature can be considered to be an infant, and that the killing of infants, always barely a crime and hardly ever worth mentioning much, let alone meting out punishment for, has come to involve a large population of people other than merely newly-born children that are just one or two days old.

However, only women may avail themselves of the category of crime “infanticide.”  When men commit child murder, they will virtually always be punished for the far more severe category “child murder” to the full extent of the law.  That means that men will serve time for it.  Women, being able to claim that the murder of a child of any age is merely an infanticide will be able to get away with almost always at most a nominal sentence (well, maybe a bit of mandatory counselling on weekends, to help them with the grief that having been forced to commit infanticide had caused them — which series of counselling sessions they often do not completely attend for more than the first one or two sessions).

There is increasingly more confusion in our society as to what gender equality is all about.  It is no wonder.  The law treats women as infantile, never fully matured adults to whom all sort of coddling must be extended.  Feminism brought that about, and it is not finished, by a long shot, to make that institutional discrimination against women a lot worse.  Pity the poor women, never able to assume full responsibility for their actions, perpetually mired in  discrimination.

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